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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 127 (some duplicates have been removed)
, buying majority control of the u.s. cell company. and with nearly one-in-three americans working contract or part-time jobs. we kick off a week-long look at how a nation of freelancers is changing our labor force. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a u-turn on wall street today. stocks rose, rebounding from sell-offs last week. good news about the american consumer put investors in a buying mood. the dow jumped 95 points, the nasdaq rose 20 and the s&p 500 up 11. retail sales rose more than 1% in september, which was better than expected. it follows an even bigger gain in august and its the best back- to-back showing since 2010. erika miller has a closer look at the data and what consumers were loading up on last month. >> reporter: it seems pretty unbelievable. but a single electronic devices appears to have powered the gain in u.s. retail sales last month. if you haven't guessed it, we're talking about the iphone 5. a remarkable five million of them were sold in their first weekend alone. and that appears to have boosted electronics sales by 4.5% in september. that was the biggest incre
unbelievable. but a single electronic devices appears to have powered the gain in u.s. retail sales last month. if you haven't guessed it, we're talking about the iphone 5. a remarkable five million of them were sold in their first weekend alone. and that appears to have boosted electronics sales by 4.5% in september. that was the biggest increase since the iphone 4s came out in october of last year. but the gain in retail sales wasn't only because of iphone. >> if you do take iphone, we still would have had a fairly decent 0.7% gain in overall retail sales spending activity. that's a very significant pop. we haven't seen that kind of growth over the past six months or so. >> reporter: and sales did rise in every retail category except department stores. consumers may be feeling better about spending. thanks to higher stock prices and stabilizing home values. >> we've seen a nice improvement in the economy over the past three months and also seen a solid rebound in wage growth and that's given consumers more confidence and more discretionary spending power. >> reporter: but unemployment is sti
people's biggest asset. only about half of u.s. households even own stocks. but what about anxiety about the presidential election and fiscal cliff? >> i think consumers really will not take notice of the political risk and political events until we are in some real critical break down stages. >> reporter: so, many consumers are feeling good heading into the holidays, even if the mood in corporate america is souring. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, the crash gold joined the sell-off today, following stocks lower, as concerns about earnings and europe, raised new questions about demand. gold fell over $20 to $17.24 an ounce, hitting a six-week low. meanwhile, european leaders wrapped up their latest summit today, the fourth this year with progress on establishing a single banking supervisor for the euro-zone. its a move that would allow the e.u.'s rescue fund to start recapitalizing ailing banks. >> susie: from wall street to >> susie: from wall street to washington: a stern warning. top banking c.e.o.'s tell lawmakers letting the fiscal cliff happen would bring quo
on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy their broadband networking equipment from z.t.e. and huawei. >> our advice to the private sector is this: your obligation is to consider larger data protection and national security implications of your business decisions and we would not advise doing business with these two companies. >> reporter: washington has become increasingly alarmed by cyber-security threats believed to have been launched from china. cyber theft of
they going to start moving in the right direction. >> and you were telling me that as far as u.s. investors are concerned, that there has been a decoupling of what is going on between the u.s. and europe. especially as we see that spain is probably going to get money it needs and its ratings are stabilized by moodies recently it so tell us eye little bit more that there is decoupling going on. >> sure. and i think from the market's perspective we are starting to see a decoupling. the basic they are lee is there were two big issues in europe. there was a fiscal crisis and a european banking crisis. i think the market is starting to realize that the fiscal cries his take a long time to get resolved. yet the banking crisis to a certain extent has been contained by the ecb stepping in to become the lender of last resort. so for that reason, we are looking at the markets here in the u.s. starting to focus more on fundamentals here in the united states, so much in every headline coming out of europe. >> should we be more concerned about what is going on in china, especially with the news that cam
. the u.s. economy picks up steam thanks to spending by consumers and the government. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. we take you to a wells fargo event in chicago, where housing grants could turn renters into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries, tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset management joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe youoo. thas to a pick-up in spending by consers, the federal government and the housing sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy in the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post great r
that's right before we go into the fiscal cliff debate in the u.s. the fed is going to be very concerned about that and put out a very tough stress test on the banks. we'll see what happens, but i think it could be yet again a little bit disappointed for what we hoped for in terms of dividends. > dividends. >> susan: we're going to have to leave it there. any disclosures, fred, on the stocks you talked about? >> no. thanks. great to be on with you, susie. >> susan: thanks, have a great weekend. fred cannon. >. >> i'm diane eastabrook in chicago. still ahead, is the housing market ready to rally? i'll tell you what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major avera
demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commercial building and construction side, there's still very little signs of life there. >> susie: you know wha, are your calculus telling you? we hear how businesses are weighed down by uncertainty. are they puting in more orders with you, or less? >> well, it's slowing down a little bit on some segments and other segments are strong. i believe if you look at it on a regional basis. the euro sown, as we've seen yesterday from projections. it's obviously in a difficult spot and continues to slow down. i just spent a week in china two weeks ago and had a lot of meetings with customers and as well as high government officials, and i could see that they're putting in a similar program which is strongly targeted on the i
. until there is greater clarity on the election, the fiscal cliff and the u.s. economy, market pros predict stocks prices will remain relatively stuck. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: regional banks, a look at why the housing comeback can't save the regional bank stocks. it's make or break tonight, for the presidential candidates. polls show president obama and governor mi romney are neck- and-neck. tonight they have their third and final debate in boca raton, and tom is there. tom. florida is the big fridz for the campaign. it has the most number of electoral vote its at stake, in the fall election. it's also a state that has felt the full force of the great recession. the housing market in some areas in florida has shown signs of life but remains well bloat boon years. the job market in the sunshine state has seen slow recovery. >> the lunch crowd start to its file in to vinnie's all day calf nie boca raton around 11:30. despite it's name vinnys is owned by a guy named jay dietz. he bought the restaurant from vinny more than
of wood asset management joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by consumers, the federal government and the housing sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy in the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post great recession, it should be a lot better. experts call it a side-ways economy, one that is unable to create enough jobs to bring down the nation's stubborn unemployment rate. but, people on the streets of new york have different takes on what a 2% economy means to them: >> it means first of all that anyone trying to look for employment is going have a tough time b
of oil is floating in the spill area. the u.s. coast guard today said oil samples match b.p.'s macando well, and the oil giant says the sheen likely came from a bent pipe under the surface. lawmakers are calling for an inspection, but federal officials say they don't think the oil will make it to shore. two years ago, the transocean- owned and british petroleum- operat "dewatehorizon" rig exploded, killing 11 people and causing the worst offshore oil spill in u.s. history. weaker than expected demand-- that's what advanced micro devices said tonight as it cut third-quarter revenue estimates. the computer chip maker says a sluggish global economy is hurting sales across all product lines. amd now sees revenues falling 10% to around $1.3 billion. the shares ended the regular trading session up slightly at $3.20 a share. for the year, they're down 41%, and in after-hours trading tonight, they fell below $3. the a.m.d. warni comes as we see personal computer sales in a nosedive. two research firms are out with new data showing p.c. shipments in the latest quarter fell more than 8% from a y
workers since the great recession. the u.s. economy may be recovering, but there has not been much of a gain in construction employment. >> construction employment has been very spotty. we've seen a couple of months and then it flattens out or even drops back down. >> reporter: in the past two years, the construction industry has added 36,000 jobs. that's a fraction of the 3.9 million positions that have been eated in the private sector overl. but there has been one bright spot across the nation: apartment construction. the reason has as much to do with lifestyle preference, as economics. >> there does seem to be a shift in preferences among young, potential homebuyers to live closer to the city or in the first ring of suburbs. many of them are looking to stay in apartments living rather than having a home further out where they need a car to get any where. they would have more of a mortgage they would be tied into. >> reporter: on the flip side, public spending on construction has fallen sharply. it's down 3.5% from a year ago, as state and local governments tighten their belts. t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 127 (some duplicates have been removed)